Saturday, August 20, 2011

Nissan Juke

    Nissan Juke

Crossovers by definition are vehicles built on a car's platform but possess features of a traditional sport utility vehicle, SUV.  Crossovers are becoming increasingly popular with many different car manufacturers trying to inject their own versions into the market.  With so many different models available to date, the consumer is spoilt for choice. This article will help to narrow the gap between the best and the worst of this new breed of vehicle platform.
5. Hyundai Veracruz
The Hyundai Veracruz is the largest vehicle Hyundai that has ever been sold in North America. The cross over come SUV is a well-built vehicle, where cost is proportional to the build.  Hyundai drew inspiration from Lexus when developing the Veracruz, rather than replicating similarities of other crossover manufacturers. The Veracruz boasts a luxurious interior, a 3.8-litre V6 and an all-wheel drive experience.
Although the Veracruz does not particularly exceed Lexus's prestigious car design, the similarities are uncanning.  Hyundai's crossover is a valuable contribution to the crossover competition.
4. Volkswagen Tiguan
The Tiguan is a small and agile approach to building a cross over. Although its appearance should not fool a potential buyer, as its 1.4 litre supercharged engine packs up to 150bhp. Shifting the Tiguan is no problem at all, especially as its engine is exceptionally responsive. The finely tuned balanced chassis allows the Tiguan to drive well around corners, as well as the straights it may encounter.  The overall exterior beauty of the Tiguan is smart but classy; the main feature of this crossover is its spacious interior, despite its insignificant outer appearance.  Although this may be a lot more expensive than many of its Japanese competitors, Volkswagen have done a remarkable job on developing such a nimble and tough crossover.
3.
Acura RDX
Acura has done a commendable job with their MDX utility. Although the price tag may be a bit too steep for some, the smart all-wheel drive system makes the 2010 Acura RDX one of the sportiest small crossovers to date.  Its super charged engine however seems to leave the driver feeling slightly short of the extra power needed to shift the RDX. Up to 70% of the power from the engine is directed to the rear wheels under hard acceleration. The optional extras, such as the satellite navigation system and the ELS audio system are nice additions which help justify the cost of the RDX.
2. Mazda CX-7
Mazda's had cleverly designed a cross over which many would mistake to be a larger hot hatch.  By nature crossovers tend to be less tip happy than high profile SUVs. The Mazda CX-7  is a single model with no trim levels or engine choices.  The fuel efficient, turbo-charged diesel engine is perfectly suited for the CX-7's lightweight chassis.  The CX-7 offers buyers a good-looking, well-specified alternative to a the more obvious competition in the crossover class. Dynamically the Mazda is among the best, however it's a great shame that it's taken Mazda so long to realise the CX-7's potential.
Nissan Juke
Design in the UK at the Nissans Paddington Design Centre, the juke utilizes SUV styling proportions to create a car that's considerably wider and longer than a micro and only marginally taller. The sport coupé looking Juke has exaggerated bumpers, 370Z inspired tail lamps and huge circular spotlights at the front. The audacious exterior theme carries over inside, with a slick audio system and a striking centre console, the juke's aesthetic value is defiantly on to attract many consumers.  Driving a Nissan Juke in west London would definitely raise a few eyebrows. Nissan has always been a key contributor to the SUV market; there experience and design efforts here are clearly apparent within the Juke.


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